Tuesday, November 13, 2018

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It may not feel like it with our warm, clear weather – but we’re already thinking about our Winter Break camp programs. This year we return to old favorites like Winter Survival: Fire and Knives, Here We Go a-Waffling, and role-playing camps like School of Magic. We’ve also been busy coming up with some new themes for 2019. Wilders Chef: Tortillas, Tamales, and Tacos will keep you warm on a chilly winter day, while Elven Archers blends fantasy adventure with archery skills.

This is also the time of year where we also start planning for one of our favorite events of the year – the Trackers Earth Holiday Party. It’s a great way to enjoy friends, food and fun activities. Don’t forget to bring an entry for our famous cookie contest… or just sample the entries and cast your vote for the true cookie champion.

Finally, just around the corner is something brand new: Trackers Thanksgiving break camps. What better way to build up an appetite for the holiday and burn all that School’s Out energy than with some amazing outdoor camps. Get outside and explore with favorites like Wilderness Survival: Fire & Knives and Archery Adventure. Thanksgiving Break Camps are the perfect time for younger 4-5 year-old campers to try out a day of awesome Trackers themes like Faeries, Elves & Mostly Friendly Dragons and Rovers Forest Camp before Summer.

As days get shorter and nights get longer, it’s important to find community and adventure – we hope to see you soon.

See you in the woods,
Molly

P.S.: Speaking of Summer… keep an eye on our newsletter for our summer theme and location announcements, coming soon. We have some new surprises for you that we can’t wait to share.

Next week we’re releasing Portland Summer Camps for 2019! That’s also when our Super Early Discount begins, where parents can save up to 15% off registration. In anticipation of the launch, I want to share a couple summer surprises with our families.

Vancouver, Cedar Hills, Happy Valley, Oh my! We’re offering several new locations, including an additional site in West Portland (Cedar Hills) and one in Vancouver (so many parents have asked). Also by popular request, our Happy Valley site moves further north. Plus, watch out for our bonus satellite site near the Mt. Tabor area.

Climb, Bike, Hike & Paddle We’re expanding our Trackers Outdoor Adventure programs, offering kayaking and climbing to younger, as well as older, campers. Our new water adventures now include kayaks, stand-up paddleboards, and canoes. Meanwhile, younger kids can learn to ride a bike, while tweens and teens mountain bike the awesome trails of the Pacific Northwest.

And Don’t Forget All our classic themes are back, from Survivor Games to Realms of Cascadia. This includes new versions like Ninja Parkour Warrior, a camp that combines martial arts with forest free-running (Grade 4-5), along with a Jr Survival Adventure (Grade PreK-K)!

Finally Every Trackers Summer Camp now comes with a free camp T-Shirt, morning snack, and a coupon book featuring local businesses we’ve partnered with!

Oh, and did I mention Sew, Craft & Design camps? Really, I can’t fit all the exciting new options into one blog. So keep an eye out for future updates featuring the next evolution of Trackers Camps.

See you in the woods,

Molly Deis
Trackers Earth
Founder & Mom

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It doesn’t feel like an Oregon summer without a trip to the dunes! Check out our favorite photos from our Wilderness Skills Instructor Training program’s trip to the Dunes in the gallery below.

I was 14 years old and reading Walden. About three-quarters of the way through the book, I said to my parents:

This high school thing isn’t working for me, I need to do something different. I’m going to explore the wilderness.

They offered no argument and zero debate. Instead, they went about helping me figure out how to make it happen. My mother and father saw that I was suffering during my Freshman year. I found prescriptive education stifling, evidenced by my (possibly pretentious) interest in 19th-century transcendentalism. The strict compartmentalization of conventional classrooms felt painful. Moreover, I was consistently bullied and struggled socially.

But in nature, there was no edict limiting what I could explore and who I could learn from. There were no fluorescent lights pushing my face into a desk. And no one to tease me when I didn’t know the latest band or wasn’t a star Sportsball player.

Eventually, I discovered Forest Craft. My goal: learn the skills that bring me closer to the Wild. My family couldn’t afford to send me to a class across the country or buy books on the subject. Yet what they lacked in financial resources they more than made up for in love and encouragement.

Because Forest Craft is both so deep and so broad, it can be a challenge to learn without teachers. There were no outdoor homeschool programs that I knew of. This was long before bushcraft videos on YouTube. All I had was my bike and a library card.

That process of self-education often proved more profound than answers from a ready-made curriculum. Eventually, I helped assemble a growing community of like-minded folks who shared an appreciation for the natural world. Some also left high school with the same vision. We made primitive shelters, surviving the elements with no modern gear. We foraged through seasons of wild foods. We tracked the local bears, getting to know them like they were part of our own village. Together we learned challenging and epic lessons from the wilderness.

Conventional education failed to provide me with healthy social connections, wilder freedom, and deeper roots. My journey may have started out inspired by Thoreau’s solitary rantings by Walden Pond, but with the support of my big Italian Family, we evolved into a village. And, at some point along the way, we started to call it Trackers. Twenty-eight years later, I feel privileged to be part of that community with our staff and the families we serve.

I know there is a better way for children to grow and learn than the prescriptive education forced upon us. My own children learn through their connection to nature and the freedom it brings. Their “home school days” are often spent wandering the forest, sometimes without an adult. They talk about plants and animals in those woods like they are old friends. And they’re surrounded by more than just teachers, they have mentors who I consider their extended family.

That’s the goal of all our year-round programs, from our Homeschool Outdoor Program to our Weekend Apprenticeships: Give every kid a connection that goes beyond school. Help them find a vision that empowers many generations beyond their own adventures in learning.
See you in the woods,

Tony
Trackers Earth, Founder

We can’t believe it’s already July! Between firing countless arrows, going fishing and catching some almost as tall as us, starting campfires together, picking wild red huckleberries, brushing a friendly goat, and so much more, June went by too fast! Check out our favorite Summer Camp photos in the gallery below.

Humans can be a healthy part of the natural world in ways that increase biodiversity for wildlife. While the proper practices of Bushcraft often caretake for the land, Leave No Trace is meant to lessen our impact, it is not meant to steward it.

Of course, varying levels of leaving no trace prove vital for certain areas that see dramatic human impact and recreation—such as many of our national and public parks. Yet, depending on the area, living with the land through seasonal rounds and thoughtful harvest can be beneficial for local flora and fauna.

A true Bushcraft practitioner does not act solely for their own survival. Every act of harvesting and crafting must also tend to the wild and more-than-human-world. For example, burning small diameter, wild harvested firewood (for camp and cooking fires) can decrease fuel loads and fuel ladders in specific areas. This in turn significantly decreases wildfire danger. Properly harvesting/coppicing willow shoots for basketry increases density for bird habitat. And harvesting invasive species for food, such as purple varnish clams, carp, and Japanese knotweed, reopens territory for native species.

When visiting areas where varying degrees of leave no trace is essential, such as heavily used recreation and public areas, awareness-based Bushcraft skills from tracking and bird language (the art of identifying animal movements based on the mapped sequence of multiple bird calls and alarms), are also beneficial in truly getting to know such places. Also, Bushcraft of Stewardship teaches us to travel through the land as softly as possible. You learn to walk in a way where you leave barely any tracks. Silence and deliberate movement is a strategy of survival and Bushcraft, especially minimizing the disturbance of songbirds to not interrupt their feeding and baseline routines. As you become less of a disruption to the immediate avian environment, you are seen as less of a foreign invader by all wildlife (they often adjust their movements based on bird alarms). As a result, you see more animals wherever you go.

Finally, there is even greater outdoor educational value with truly hands-on wilderness skills. When we are profoundly dependent on what is often viewed as “wild” for our shelter, water, fire, and food, this fosters communal, social, and even familial relationships with the more-than-human world. Such humbling connections can prove difficult to replicate when we only perceive nature as a recreational luxury and privilege. Putting nature ONLY in parks is what possibly leads to the blithe social indifference towards the wilderness, an attitude so pervasive in the modern world where every convenience can be ordered online.

Through our everyday teaching at Trackers Earth, while educating thousands of children and adults each year, we observe the stewardship and educational value of Bushcraft. Bringing what is wild back into our everyday lives helps us remember the following: we must preserve the wilderness we have left, but we also must make what has once been domesticated, wild once again.

At Trackers Earth, our mission is to get your kids into nature by meeting at convenient locations close to you, then transporting kids into the best parks and green spaces.

This year we have added one new location, and return to three more of our old favorites! Plus, after camp is now available in all our satellite sites. Read on to learn more about our Summer 2018 Drop-Off sites.