Look at That Bird!

To learn the best ways to get kids excited about bird watching and fun birding activities you can do together, I talked with author, nature photographer and bird nerd, Karen DeWitz. Karen has a new book out for kids that focuses on the most common and cool birds here in the Pacific Northwest. Look at That Bird! is filled with fun facts and photos of the birds kids are most likely to see in their backyards. It also gives the important details about each bird and shows kids and families the best ways to spot them. There are also fun, easy birding activities families can do together.

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Finding Fairies

Spring is here! The birds are singing. The frogs are peeping. The crocuses and forsythia are blooming away. It’s a time of rebirth and hope (especially this year). It is also a great time to search for fairies with your kids. Maybe you’re a believer in the Magical Folk, maybe you’re not. It doesn’t matter. What matters is that looking for fairies is a wonderful way to spark your child’s imagination and get them observing and interacting with nature. It’s also a great way to get kids outside for hours of independent, creative play.

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Search for the Northern Lights

It’s a great time for a family road trip. A few years ago a friend of mine, Liz Rusch, took a very cool road trip—planned and led by her teen, Izzi—where they went on a journey in search of the Northern Lights. They traveled to Alaska and Montana, hoping to see it, but no luck. They returned home and figured out a way to see the aurora right in their home state of Oregon!

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Teach Your Kids to Ski

Hooray, Spring is here! The sun is shining, crocuses are blooming, birds are singing and it feels like time to start working in the garden. But wait! There is still snow in the mountains and plenty of months left to teach your kids to ski, cross-country or downhill. While it may not feel like ski time, spring often brings more mountain snow than winter, plus the warmer weather and “bluebird” skies make for perfect teaching conditions.

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