Sunday, May 19, 2019

From Jordana, Trackers Storyteller

Gearing up for an adventure can be hard. Where did you leave those snowshoes from last year? Have you pumped up your bike tires since last summer? Moreover, where is that bike pump? Are there enough warm socks and snacks in the car for a rainy hike?

Getting ready takes some preparation. But instead of turning an early morning into a hectic moment of child- and partner- and pet- and thing-wrangling, set yourself up for success by harnessing the power of mise en place. This French phrase is used in professional kitchens around the world to cultivate a state of readiness. But out of the kitchen, these principles can help us set the stage for adventures, and make it easy (and fun!) to get going.

Make a packing list for longer trips that you save in your phone or computer. That way you know exactly what you need to gather.

Keep extra clothes such as base layers, socks, towels, and gloves in the car. Being warm and dry can be the difference between a great and miserable day.

As the weather turns brighter and the sun comes out, be sure to have sunscreen on hand at all times. I like to put a small tube in each of my adventure bags so I’m never without.

Build a snack-pack for the pantry. Replenish it with granola bars, jerky, and your family’s favorites after you get back from an adventure so it’s ready to go for the next trip. Store it in a mouse-proof container!

Water bottles. Truly, it seems like there are never enough. But keeping bottle in the car or in your pack means that you will be more hydrated for your day, leading to overall health and happiness.

At Trackers, we know it’s important to model real enthusiasm for getting outside. We want to inspire children to engage with their surroundings, to play and explore freely, and to feel confident that they are prepared for whatever nature throws at them. Plus, kids really like to be (mostly) helpful in planning and packing gear. We hope that by encouraging a little mindful preparation, you’ll be ready to take advantage of all summer has to offer.

What about you? Do you have any great tips and tricks for packing up and heading out? We’d love to hear your ideas for adventure planning.

2019 Apprenticeships for Youth & Teens – Ready to Register

Apprenticeships are our year-round mentoring programs. They take place 1 weekend-a-month from September to May. Trackers staff and I truly appreciate this incredible opportunity to go beyond summer, helping kids develop greater connection to community and nature. We offer options for ages 4 to 17. This year brings a couple of new features

New Programs Along with familiar favorites such as Wilders Farm Craft, we also offer new programs exploring subjects such as Ninja Martial Arts & Forest Parkour and Photography. Also, Outdoor Leadership for Hiking, Boating & Climbing now has a single day option for all ages along with the popular overnight session. See below for a list of all programs…

More Space Quickly growing into one of our most popular programs, Apprenticeships had a waitlist of over 250 students last year. Because of this interest, we have expanded our capacity for each weekend. While we cannot guarantee there will not be another waitlist, we want to share this experience with more children, teens, and their families.

New Facilities We are excited to open our new Arts & Crafts Annex—only 5 blocks from our HQ. This newly remodeled learning studio features a dedicated classroom for Ceramics and Woodworking, along with one of the largest Blacksmithing Shops on the west coast. Plus, as Blacksmithing gets its own location, our indoor Archery range will expand.

Why Apprentice?

Finally, I want to talk about how our Apprenticeship programs can help support the families we serve by reflecting on my experiences with my own children in the program.

Friend Connections I have seen kids in Apprenticeships become part of a team and much more. My own kids have discovered lasting friendships through sharing these adventures. Many Apprentices return year after year.

Skills & Nature Connection Each Apprenticeship offers its own set of skills, but they also are an immersion that connects kids to natural world. As kids explore the outdoors and traditional crafts, they learn life lessons of resilience, thoughtfulness, and mutual respect.

Leadership & Mentoring Our long term goal is to cultivate leadership skills for community and stewardship. Our most experienced educators mentor students to take ownership of their own learning.

Remember to register soon if you plan on joining us. As always, feel free to email me with any questions about how we can best care for and support your family—replying to this email goes directly to me! We can also meet in person at our Portland Camp Fair this Saturday on April 20, 2019.

See you in the woods,

Molly Deis
Trackers Earth
Founder & Mom

 

Find your Apprenticeship!

An extended community is crucial to raising children. As a parent, I’ve experienced the need for support from family, neighbors, and educators. Our children grow by learning from many different mentors. Tony and I started Trackers Earth in 2004 with a common purpose:

Greater connection to community, nature, our heritage, and future.

It is our community of teachers that makes Trackers special. Many camp programs only hire instructors for summer, which limits who can teach for them. Yet, along with a fantastic seasonal staff, we work to create an educational network that employs more and more teachers throughout the year. As a result, our Village of educators brings experience and responsibility to the journey of helping to raise our children.

A Village thrives through reciprocity: getting support and giving support. Since our founding, so many parents and students have supported us, spreading the word and growing Trackers into one of the largest outdoor programs in Oregon and beyond. In turn, our teachers and I promise to work every day to fulfill that community promise towards greater connection for all generations and the future.

Thank you and see you in the forest,

Molly
Trackers Earth
Founder & Mom

Trackers Earth summer camps are like nothing else in the known universe. Explore all our 2019 summer camp themes: Wilderness Survival, Farming, Fishing, Archery, Wizards, Ninjas, Secret Agents, Blacksmithing, Rock Climbing, Biking & more!

I was 14 years old and reading Walden. About three-quarters of the way through the book, I said to my parents:

This high school thing isn’t working for me, I need to do something different. I’m going to explore the wilderness.

They offered no argument and zero debate. Instead, they went about helping me figure out how to make it happen. My mother and father saw that I was suffering during my Freshman year. I found prescriptive education stifling, evidenced by my (possibly pretentious) interest in 19th-century transcendentalism. The strict compartmentalization of conventional classrooms felt painful. Moreover, I was consistently bullied and struggled socially.

But in nature, there was no edict limiting what I could explore and who I could learn from. There were no fluorescent lights pushing my face into a desk. And no one to tease me when I didn’t know the latest band or wasn’t a star Sportsball player.

Eventually, I discovered Forest Craft. My goal: learn the skills that bring me closer to the Wild. My family couldn’t afford to send me to a class across the country or buy books on the subject. Yet what they lacked in financial resources they more than made up for in love and encouragement.

Because Forest Craft is both so deep and so broad, it can be a challenge to learn without teachers. There were no outdoor homeschool programs that I knew of. This was long before bushcraft videos on YouTube. All I had was my bike and a library card.

That process of self-education often proved more profound than answers from a ready-made curriculum. Eventually, I helped assemble a growing community of like-minded folks who shared an appreciation for the natural world. Some also left high school with the same vision. We made primitive shelters, surviving the elements with no modern gear. We foraged through seasons of wild foods. We tracked the local bears, getting to know them like they were part of our own village. Together we learned challenging and epic lessons from the wilderness.

Conventional education failed to provide me with healthy social connections, wilder freedom, and deeper roots. My journey may have started out inspired by Thoreau’s solitary rantings by Walden Pond, but with the support of my big Italian Family, we evolved into a village. And, at some point along the way, we started to call it Trackers. Twenty-eight years later, I feel privileged to be part of that community with our staff and the families we serve.

I know there is a better way for children to grow and learn than the prescriptive education forced upon us. My own children learn through their connection to nature and the freedom it brings. Their “home school days” are often spent wandering the forest, sometimes without an adult. They talk about plants and animals in those woods like they are old friends. And they’re surrounded by more than just teachers, they have mentors who I consider their extended family.

That’s the goal of all our year-round programs, from our Homeschool Outdoor Program to our Weekend Apprenticeships: Give every kid a connection that goes beyond school. Help them find a vision that empowers many generations beyond their own adventures in learning.
See you in the woods,

Tony
Trackers Earth, Founder

Humans can be a healthy part of the natural world in ways that increase biodiversity for wildlife. While the proper practices of Bushcraft often caretake for the land, Leave No Trace is meant to lessen our impact, it is not meant to steward it.

Of course, varying levels of leaving no trace prove vital for certain areas that see dramatic human impact and recreation—such as many of our national and public parks. Yet, depending on the area, living with the land through seasonal rounds and thoughtful harvest can be beneficial for local flora and fauna.

A true Bushcraft practitioner does not act solely for their own survival. Every act of harvesting and crafting must also tend to the wild and more-than-human-world. For example, burning small diameter, wild harvested firewood (for camp and cooking fires) can decrease fuel loads and fuel ladders in specific areas. This in turn significantly decreases wildfire danger. Properly harvesting/coppicing willow shoots for basketry increases density for bird habitat. And harvesting invasive species for food, such as purple varnish clams, carp, and Japanese knotweed, reopens territory for native species.

When visiting areas where varying degrees of leave no trace is essential, such as heavily used recreation and public areas, awareness-based Bushcraft skills from tracking and bird language (the art of identifying animal movements based on the mapped sequence of multiple bird calls and alarms), are also beneficial in truly getting to know such places. Also, Bushcraft of Stewardship teaches us to travel through the land as softly as possible. You learn to walk in a way where you leave barely any tracks. Silence and deliberate movement is a strategy of survival and Bushcraft, especially minimizing the disturbance of songbirds to not interrupt their feeding and baseline routines. As you become less of a disruption to the immediate avian environment, you are seen as less of a foreign invader by all wildlife (they often adjust their movements based on bird alarms). As a result, you see more animals wherever you go.

Finally, there is even greater outdoor educational value with truly hands-on wilderness skills. When we are profoundly dependent on what is often viewed as “wild” for our shelter, water, fire, and food, this fosters communal, social, and even familial relationships with the more-than-human world. Such humbling connections can prove difficult to replicate when we only perceive nature as a recreational luxury and privilege. Putting nature ONLY in parks is what possibly leads to the blithe social indifference towards the wilderness, an attitude so pervasive in the modern world where every convenience can be ordered online.

Through our everyday teaching at Trackers Earth, while educating thousands of children and adults each year, we observe the stewardship and educational value of Bushcraft. Bringing what is wild back into our everyday lives helps us remember the following: we must preserve the wilderness we have left, but we also must make what has once been domesticated, wild once again.

As a primitive skills instructor, I spend a lot of time around fire. I like to think I have a special relationship with fire. I know for a fact I have spent more time in front of fires than in front of a television. Many times I have watched people try, yet fail, to build an adequate fire. In my opinion, building, lighting, and maintaining a fire should be taught in every elementary school. Like math.

Fire is a necessity for wilderness survival and primitive living. Yet of all the outdoor skills, building a proper fire structure is one of the most overlooked. It doesn’t matter how many techniques you learn for making fire–whether you’re using bow-drill, flint and steel, fire piston or a Bic lighter–if you don’t have a proper fire structure to ignite, you will probably end up cold, wet, and miserable.

Fire needs three things to exist: heat, oxygen, and fuel. If you remove any of these from the equation, fire will cease. A fire that is burning properly will be warm, provide good light, and be nearly smokeless.

Material Selection

In fire building, material selection is everything. As with any primitive skill, if you take the time to select ideal materials you will be rewarded by saving energy during the crafting process.

Here are a few tips on gathering wood:

Dry wood is key. Whenever possible, I gather wood that is not on the ground. When wood lays on the ground it absorbs moisture and is harder to get burning. I choose dead branches off live trees or dead saplings, and I also collect branches that have fallen off trees and gotten hung up in the forest understory. Remember to keep it dead and dry.

You don’t just want to gather wood willy-nilly, however. There is a method to collecting that trumps all others.

  1. Tinder. The first thing you need to collect is good, dry tinder. Tinder can be made from any dry, fibrous plant material or the inner bark of some trees. When looking for tinder I seek out fields or open areas where there are dry grasses and leaves. You can also use old flower heads. The best tinder is dry and fibrous with lots of surface area to ignite. I love when I find dead, dry poplar trees because the inner bark can be shredded and made into great tinder. If you have cedar trees around, you can use your knife to scrape tinder from the outer bark as well. I collect way more tinder than I need so I can have some in reserve to use later. When it starts raining you’ll be happy to have extra, dry tinder!
  1. Sticks. Next, collect a large bundle of what I call “pencil lead” wood: small, thin, dry twigs or woody stalk plants, about as thick as a pencil lead, not quite as thick as a pencil. When you start constructing your fire, these sticks will go around your tinder. Just like tinder, these sticks have a lot of surface area and will catch fire quickly once the tinder gets going. The tinder and pencil lead wood will be the two inner layers, the core of your fire structure.
  2. Branches. Now it’s time to gather the three outer layers of your fire structure. Collect about 30 pencil-thick branches, then 20 thumb-thick, and finally 10 “OK”-thick branches (make the “OK” sign with your thumb and forefinger).
  3. Get organized. Once you’ve collected all five types of wood for your inner and outer layers, lay your sticks and materials out by size. It’s time to start construction of your fire structure.

Building a Fire Structure

Fire ring. If you have a fire ring available, use it. If not, you need to construct a fire ring to contain your fire. A ring of large rocks will do the trick. If rocks aren’t available and local laws allow, dig a small depression in the ground about two feet wide and six inches deep. Build the fire in the depression to keep it contained.

Clear the space. It’s very important to clear away any and all debris near your fire ring that your fire might catch on for about 10 feet around. Our goal is to make a small fire, not burn the woods down! There’s an ancient saying: ”You can build a man a fire and he will be warm for a little while, or you can light a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life!”

Teepee Structure. One of the most basic and functional ways to start your fire is to build a teepee structure. In this shape, each layer of the fire is responsible for igniting the layer on top of it. When built well, it will even shed water! If the outer layer gets rained on, it will protect and keep dry the core of the structure.

  1. Start by putting a softball-sized ball of tinder in the center of your fire pit. If the ground is damp, put the tinder on a piece of bark or some dry leaves.
  2. Next, place bundles of the pencil lead-thick wood around the tinder in a teepee shape (see image above). Make sure they are actually touching the tinder and be sure to leave a small area open where you can ignite the tinder inside the teepee of sticks.
  3. After that’s done, lay the pencil thick wood around the structure. Repeat the process with the thumb and “OK” thick branches.
  4. Once the fire gets going, then you can add larger pieces of wood. Not before or you will put it out.

Personally, I try and keep my fires as small as possible. Smaller fires are easier to manage and eat less wood.

One-match challenge

Now that you know the nuts and bolts of building a proper fire structure, it’s time to put it into practice. Like any new skill, it is important that you practice, and a great way to practice is the “one-match fire challenge”. The challenge is exactly what it sounds like: build a fire structure that you can light with one match. If you’ve done everything right, from tinder collection all the way through construction of the fire structure, you should have no problem getting it to light!

You will get the most dynamic practice by building and lighting fires in every season and all weather conditions.

Want to give yourself an even bigger challenge? Gather, construct, build, and light a fire in 5 minutes or less.

This is one of those skills that can truly save your life one day. Practice it, perfect it and pass it on.